nfl kicking coach.com - recruiting process


So you are considering playing college athletics ?  We hope this guide will provide you with information to help you better understand the recruiting process, time-line, and resources available to you.

Go Directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center <<

Goals and Ability Assessment
If you are interested in playing college athletics - there is a place for you!
They key is finding the best fit for both your academic and your athletic
abilities and understanding your commitment to both. Ideally you will
find a school that is a good match for you, where you will actually play
on the team, rather than watch the team.

There are two typical inroads for athletes. If you are a solid high school player with an
outstanding record, the college coaches will contact you. If that doesn’t
happen, don’t get discouraged!

So it's common that many young players don’t peak during their until after their year, yet coaches can see the potential. In this case, you will be the one to initiate contact.

Perhaps you are a player who simply enjoys playing the game and would like to continue to do so on the college level. NCAA Division II or III or NAIA schools can be excellent options. Many travel extensively and play a competitive schedule. You /the (Student-Athlete) (can also consider being a “walk-on”.
Enroll, try out for the team and earn your scholarship by your performance.
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RECRUITING TIMELINE
9TH GRADE
•A freshman becomes a PSA or
Prospective Student Athlete once they
begin their 9th grade classes.

• As a freshman, your core academic
courses will count towards your initial
NCAA Eligibility.

•Coaches are not able to send written
correspondence to a Athletes until Sept. 1 of
their Junior year and are not allowed
to initiate phone calls to Athletes until July
1st following your Junior year. However,
coaches may send a camp brochure
or an athletic questionnaire at any time.

•An Student-Athlete may visit college campuses at his/
her own expense (unofficial visits)
regardless of their age. Once the Student-Athlete is
on campus, regardless of their age, the
coach is allowed to talk to them, show
them their practice facilities and provide
the Student-Athlete up to 3 tickets to any home
athletic contest.

•When you are arranging a visit, be aware
of NCAA recruiting rules (see above),
based on your year in school, so that you
can use the proper communication
methods when contacting college
coaches. If you are trying to arrange a
visit prior to your Junior year, then you
must try to reach the coach via phone ,
as they are not allowed to reply to your
emails until September 1 of your Junior
year. College coaches are difficult to
contact by phone as they are rarely in
their offices! If you miss them initially,
keep trying to call them as there is no
limit to the number of

10th GRADE
•Sophomores are encouraged to take the
PSAT and PACT.

•SAT and ACT practice exams can be
found at bookstores and online.

•Continue to ensure that you are taking
the proper classes (review the NCAA
Eligibility Center website) and making
academics a priority.

•Continue unofficial visits (see 9th grade
information).

11th GRADE
•Register with the NCAA Eligibility
Center during your junior year in high
school. Once you complete your Junior
year, your high school transcripts should
be sent to the Eligibility Center as well as
your SAT/ACT test scores. For more
information go to
www.eligibilitycenter.org.

•Continue to ensure that you are taking
the proper classes (review the NCAA
Eligibility Center website) and making
academics a priority.

•Juniors are encouraged to take SAT &
ACT exams multiple times. When taking
the exam be sure to mark ‘9999’ on the
exam, as this will have your scores
automatically sent to the NCAA Eligibility
Center.

•NCAA rules do not allow college
coaches to contact Student-Athlete until Sept. 1 of
their Junior year. At that time they may
begin to send you recruiting information.
Coaches are not allowed to initiate calls
until after July 1st, following your Junior
year. Coaches are limited to initiating one
phone call per week (remember, you can
call a coach anytime) and a total of three
off-campus contacts may be made
throughout the recruiting process.
•Continue unofficial visits.
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Gathering Information
Make a list of what is important to you in
a college.

•Does the college offer your study of
interest? Education should be your
priority as not everyone continues on to
be a professional golfer and it is
important to have a degree in something
that suites your skills and interests.

•How big is the college? Is it too big? Too small? What is the normal
class size? Are you comfortable in a large lecture hall or would you
prefer a small class size?

•Living outside of your "Home State" can be an excellent part of your education
if you are comfortable with the idea of being far away from home. It is
good to think about the size of the city and the climate. What are you
comfortable with?

•What is the tuition and is this a realistic number?

•What are the admission standards? Are your GPA and test scores
where they need to be for this school to be an option?

Once you have an idea of the of the type of school that will be the best
fit, consider using a resource available to see which ones meet your criteria.

Research the team, their statistics and the coach. The more
information you have, the better you will be able to decide if a school is
the right fit.
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Questionnaires

After reviewing your resume, college coaches may respond by sending
you an athletic questionnaire or direct you to their website to complete
an on-line version. Some of you may receive a questionnaire as early as
9th grade. In all cases, these should be completed and returned to the
coach in a timely fashion.

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PARENTS AND RECRUITING

Parents play a critical role during this recruiting period. Going
through this process is very stressful, not only on the player but on
parents, too. Take your time, as this decision is one of the most
important decisions a junior will make.

Be supportive and encouraging during the process to help your child stay positive.
• Be realistic when discussing the junior’s potential college choices,
keeping in mind that every child is different.

• Always encourage the "athlete" to begin the process early.
• Talk to other parents about the college selection process.
• Plan to visit colleges early as this will give your child a better
understanding about colleges, their differences and preferences.
• Keep high school academics the focus. Include preparation for
SAT and ACT tests.
• When talking to the coach, do not answer questions for the athlete.
The college is considering the Student-Athlete – not the parent. The Student-Athlete,
not the parent, should complete paperwork.
• It's not recommended to put pressure on your child to play better and connect that
to receiving a scholarship.
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Scholarships

Full ride scholarships are not actually rare but players often are asked to walk on to prove themselves first. A full grant-in-aid consists of tuition, fees, room & board and required course
books. Athletes may be awarded all or part of a full grant-in-aid on a yearly basis. Renewals are not automatic.

College coaches divide the scholarships available so they can offer financial aid to more students. It is in the best interest of the coach and prospective team to divide his scholarship grants.

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What is Financial Aid?

Financial Aid is money that is given, paid or loaned to student to help pay for your college or vocational training. It helps eligible students pay for educational expenses at an eligible postsecondary school (e.g. college, vocational school, graduate school). There are several types of financial aid for college students:
Federal Grants Federal funding given as awards and do not require repayment.
State Grants State funding given as awards and do not require repayment.
Federal Loans Funding borrowed from a lending institution. You are required to repay the loan amount and interest fees
Scholarships Funding given as awards and do not require repayment.
Work-Study This allows you to earn money for your education (Off-campus community service work opportunities are provided through the Federal Work-Study Program. On- and off-campus work-study employment assignments are coordinated by the Financial Planning Services Office).
Other


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The Campus Visit

Visiting colleges is an important part of the process. Plan on taking no more than 30 minutes of the coach’s time.
In this short period, be prepared to ask questions and make a positive impression. Bringing a note pad with your questions and a place to write down answers will help you feel prepared and organized.

Research the school, coach and program. Here are some possible questions:
• Team and Practice Commitments, hours, GPA, ect.
• Do you have a mandatory strength and conditioning program?
• How many players will you recruit over the next two years? Who are some of the other players in my graduating class you are recruiting? How competitive do you think the team will be over the next several years?
• How do you interact with players during practice to improve their game?
• How is the traveling team determined?
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NCAA RULES IN REVIEW
RULES OF RECRUITING
During 2011, the NCAA is expected to announce major changes to the college golf
recruiting process. Please make sure to check the NCAA’s website, www.ncaa.org
for the most up to date information on the Division I recruiting process.

Rules of Recruiting:
Please keep in mind that Coaches are not able to send written correspondence to a Student-Athlete until Sept. 1 of a Student-Athlete Junior year and are not allowed to initiate phone calls to a Student-Athlete until July 1st following your Junior year. However, coaches my send a Student-Athlete a camp brochure or athletic questionnaire at anytime.

* A Student-Athlete may visit college campuses at his/her own expense (unofficial visits) regardless of their age. Once the Student-Athlete is on campus, the coach is allowed to talk to them, show them their practice facilities and provide the Student-Athlete up to 3 tickets to any home athletic
contest.

When you are trying to arrange a visit be aware of NCAA recruiting rules (see above), based on your year in school, so that you can use the proper communication methods when contacting college coaches.

If you are trying to arrange a visit prior to your Junior year, than you must try to reach the coach via phone, as they are not allowed to reply to your emails until September 1 of your Junior year.

College coaches are difficult to contact by phone as they are rarely in their offices! If you miss them initially, keep trying to call them. Remember, there
is no limit to the number of times a Student-Athlete can call or email a coach.

Telephone Calls:
In Division I, Phone calls from faculty members and coaches are not permitted until July 1 after the completion of your junior year. After this, a college coach or faculty member may call you or your parents once a week. In Division II, coaches may initiate phone calls to a Student-Athlete beginning June 15 after your Junior year and in Division III, college coaches
can call a Student-Athlete at any time. You or your parents may call a coach as often as you wish and at anytime, regardless of your year in school.

Contact:
A college coach may contact you in person off the
college campus no more than three times on or after
July 1 of your junior year. Any face-to-face meeting
between a college coach and you or your parents,
during which any of you say more than “hello” is a
contact. Also, any face-to-face meeting that is
prearranged or that occurs at your high school,
competition or practice site is a contact, regardless
of the conversation. Coaches may not contact you
off the college campus more than three times.

Evaluations:
An evaluation is any off-campus activity used to
assess your academic qualifications or athletic
ability, including a visit to your high school (during
which no contact occurs) or watching you practice
or compete at any site. Institutions have seven
permissible recruiting opportunities (contacts and
evaluations) during the academic year, and not
more than three of the seven opportunities may be
in-person, off-campus contacts. Once you sign a
National Letter of Intent, there is no limit to the
number of contacts, evaluations or phone calls a
coach (with whom you signed) can make.

Official Visits:
During your senior year, you can have one expense paid
(official) visit per college. You may receive no
more than five such visits. You cannot make an
official visit unless you have registered with the
NCAA Eligibility Center, provided the college your
high school academic transcript and a score from a
PSAT, an SAT, a PACT or an ACT taken on a
national test date under national testing conditions.

National Letter of Intent:
A National Letter of Intent is an agreement signed
by the Prospective Student-Athlete, parent or legal
guardian and the athletic director. The agreement
states that the institution agrees to provide the
Prospective Student-Athlete, who is admitted to the
institution and is eligible for financial aid under
NCAA rules, athletic aid for one academic year in
exchange for the prospect’s agreement to attend the
institution for one academic year. Other institutions
agree not to recruit the athlete, once they have
signed an NLI.

More Resources:
The Value of Playing College Athletics <<

Related resources

Want to play college sports? – Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to ensure you have met amateurism standards and are academically prepared for college coursework.
Probability of going pro – There are more than 460,000 NCAA athletes and the reality is that very few of them will go on to play sports professionally. See the stats.
Investing where it matters – There is a lot of talk about how much money college sports generates. But did you know that more than 90 percent of the NCAA’s revenue goes to support student-athletes? Learn more.
NCAA After the Game™ – We know that most college athletes will go pro in something other than sports. NCAA After the Game is a resources for former college athletes of all ages. It’s the go-to place for help in succeeding on the biggest court of all…life.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.
During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.
The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.
The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.
Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.
A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.
NCAA Eligibility Center <<

For more information, visit www.nationalletter.org
or call (205) 458-3000.

Assad Academy has no affiliation to the NCAA, NAIA or NFL or any other Professional or amatuer team or association.  The following information and links have been installed to help refer potential student-athletes in the right direction in understanding the recruiting process.
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